yooooooo



hi i'm katie and i have a lot of feelings .
koreanmalemodels:

Hong Dooyoung for Bling 2014 calendar

koreanmalemodels:

Hong Dooyoung for Bling 2014 calendar

MUSICAL NOTATION, AS DESCRIBED BY CATS

hedwig-dordt:

cryingneedforthat:

intellectualfangirl:

trumpetangst:

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(I would have liked to crop some of these gifs (like the accent ones) to make them more accurate but alas, I lack the skills.)

the tremolo one is even more wonderful than the rest.

OMG STACCATO
AND DIMINUENDO

sigmastolen, seems relevant to you interests

(via sigmastolen)

officialfrenchtoast:

It’s a metaphor, see: you hold a pen with your homework in front of you, but you don’t do it, you don’t give it the power to do its killing

(via rebellibrarianess)

queenslibrary:

Children inside the #bookmobile, 1953. Happy #NationalBookmobileDay!

queenslibrary:

Children inside the #bookmobile, 1953. Happy #NationalBookmobileDay!

beyonceunofficial:

left is summer looks and right is “let me show u why i don’t “comb every morning” white ho”

(via googleberryitis)

cartoon-drive-thru:

Ted Pencils goes to dinner

cartoon-drive-thru:

Ted Pencils goes to dinner

(via goatcorporation)

you-wish-you-had-this-url asked: I've been seeing a lot of people talk about Gus sounding really pretentious in the movie, do you think he sounds pretentious?

fishingboatproceeds:

I mean, that scene is word-for-word from the book, so don’t blame the movie! :) Yes, Gus is super pretentious at the start of the story. it’s a character flaw.

Gus wants to have a big and important and remembered life, and so he acts like he imagines people who have such lives act. So he’s, like, says-soliloquy-when-he-means-monologue pretentious, which is the most pretentious variety of pretension in all the world.

And then his performative, over-the-top, hyper-self-aware pretentiousness must fall away for him to really connect to Hazel, just as her fear of being a grenade must fall away. That’s what the novel is about. That is its plot.

Gus must make the opposite of the traditional heroic journey—he must start out strong and end up weak in order to reimagine what constitutes a rich and well-lived life.

Basically, a 20-second clip from the first five minutes of a movie is not the movie.

(Standard acknowledgement here that I might be wrong, that I am inevitably defensive of TFIOS, that it has many flaws, that there’s nothing wrong with critical discussion, and that a strong case could be made that I should not insert myself into these conversations at all.)

sadhuman:

golden retriever festival in scotland

sadhuman:

golden retriever festival in scotland

(via senoralovegood)

musictoasoul:

tfios-changed-my-life:

tito-burritto:

tfios-changed-my-life:

So this little cigarette right here has sparked a whole new brand of TFiOS hate, much of which is coming from people who claimed to love the book. 
Many people are now pointing out how “pretentious” Augustus is, and I can’t help but think, You’re only just now realizing this. He was written to be a seemingly pretentious and arrogant person. The acknowledgement of this is actually highly important because, without it, the book loses the message that a hero’s journey is that of strength to weakness. 
Augustus Waters has big dreams for himself. He wants to be known and remembered; he wants to be a hero; he wants to be seen as perfect. But there’s already something standing in his way… He has a disability, and society tells him that a person cannot be both perfect and disabled. So what does he do? He creates a persona for himself. He tries to appear older and wiser than he is. But the pretentious side of him is NOT who he truly is. It’s all an act. (This is evident in the fact that he often uses words in the wrong context.)
And when his cancer returns, we begin to see his mask cracking. The true Augustus begins to bleed through… Hazel even takes notice of this from time to time. And by the time we get to the gas station scene, Augustus is no longer the picture of perfection he was when we met him. The play has been canceled. The actor must reveal himself. And he’s revealed to be a weak, defenseless boy, succumbing to the cancer that is made of him. 
THE PRETENTIOUSNESS IS INTENTIONAL. It stands to show Augustus’s journey from flawless to flawed, from strong to weak. It’s the key to understanding that Augustus was the hero he always wanted to be, even if he didn’t realize it. 

You sound like an English teacher. Unless you are John Green, i’m going to guess half of that is probably just in your head and the metaphor was simply that, a metaphor. Though if I am actually wrong, then I apologize.

Actually, pretty much all of this has been said by John Green himself, and, I’m not sure if you’ve read the book, but there is plenty of evidence for all of this in the book.

The fact that people are getting hateful because of that scene, which is basically a scene right out of the book, means you either just want to complain about something to seem smart and above the rest of us, or because you really didn’t understand the book.
^This person explained it perfectly.

i guess it’s like gatsby saying old sport all the time. it’s less annoying textually

musictoasoul:

tfios-changed-my-life:

tito-burritto:

tfios-changed-my-life:

So this little cigarette right here has sparked a whole new brand of TFiOS hate, much of which is coming from people who claimed to love the book. 

Many people are now pointing out how “pretentious” Augustus is, and I can’t help but think, You’re only just now realizing this. He was written to be a seemingly pretentious and arrogant person. The acknowledgement of this is actually highly important because, without it, the book loses the message that a hero’s journey is that of strength to weakness

Augustus Waters has big dreams for himself. He wants to be known and remembered; he wants to be a hero; he wants to be seen as perfect. But there’s already something standing in his way… He has a disability, and society tells him that a person cannot be both perfect and disabled. So what does he do? He creates a persona for himself. He tries to appear older and wiser than he is. But the pretentious side of him is NOT who he truly is. It’s all an act. (This is evident in the fact that he often uses words in the wrong context.)

And when his cancer returns, we begin to see his mask cracking. The true Augustus begins to bleed through… Hazel even takes notice of this from time to time. And by the time we get to the gas station scene, Augustus is no longer the picture of perfection he was when we met him. The play has been canceled. The actor must reveal himself. And he’s revealed to be a weak, defenseless boy, succumbing to the cancer that is made of him. 

THE PRETENTIOUSNESS IS INTENTIONAL. It stands to show Augustus’s journey from flawless to flawed, from strong to weak. It’s the key to understanding that Augustus was the hero he always wanted to be, even if he didn’t realize it. 

You sound like an English teacher. Unless you are John Green, i’m going to guess half of that is probably just in your head and the metaphor was simply that, a metaphor. Though if I am actually wrong, then I apologize.

Actually, pretty much all of this has been said by John Green himself, and, I’m not sure if you’ve read the book, but there is plenty of evidence for all of this in the book.

The fact that people are getting hateful because of that scene, which is basically a scene right out of the book, means you either just want to complain about something to seem smart and above the rest of us, or because you really didn’t understand the book.

^This person explained it perfectly.

i guess it’s like gatsby saying old sport all the time. it’s less annoying textually

(via kaileighmarie)

classicalconditioning:

This spring’s fashion: reverse cello-playing. You got this, Vogue.

classicalconditioning:

This spring’s fashion: reverse cello-playing. You got this, Vogue.

(via leadingtone)

(Source: ludgateing, via aubreypalazzo)

medievalpoc:

Contemporary Art Week!

girljanitor:

Lost silent film with all-Native American cast found

The Daughter of Dawn, an 80-minute feature film, was shot in July of 1920 in the Wichita Mountains Wildlife Refuge near Lawton, southwest Oklahoma. It was unique in the annals of silent film (or talkies, for that matter) for having a cast of 300 Comanches and Kiowas who brought their own clothes, horses, tipis, everyday props and who told their story without a single reference to the United States Cavalry. It was a love story, a four-person star-crossed romance that ends with the two main characters together happily ever after. There are two buffalo hunt sequences with actual herds of buffalo being chased down by hunters on bareback just as they had done on the Plains 50 years earlier.

The male lead was played by White Parker; another featured female role was played by Wanada Parker. They were the son and daughter of the powerful Comanche chief Quanah Parker, the last of the free Plains Quahadi Comanche warriors. He never lost a battle to United States forces, but, his people sick and starving, he surrendered at Fort Sill in 1875. Quanah was the son of Comanche chief Peta Nocona and Cynthia Ann Parker, the daughter of Euro-American settlers who had grown up in the tribe after she was kidnapped as a child by the Comanches who killed her parents. She was the model for Stands With a Fist in Dances with Wolves.

You can watch the first ten minutes of the film here. It is over 90 years old, and was produced by, directed by, and stars Native American people.

(via googleberryitis)

grawly:

i don’t even interpret “uwu” as a smiley i just read it as “oo woo”

(via sigmastolen)